How to see June’s full strawberry moon light up the sky in 2022

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A lunar phenomenon is coming — and the best part is, you won’t need binoculars to see it.

There’s a summer celestial treat on June 14, with the strawberry “supermoon” set to reach its peak.

The moon will be at the closest point in its orbit around the Earth — called perigee — at 7:51 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time on June 14, which will make it appear like a “supermoon.”

However, it won’t be until 12 hours later that it will be visible, being at its brightest and fullest in North America after sunset.

According to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the moon will look “full” for three full days, having started Sunday evening and continuing through Wednesday morning.

NASA said it’s the second time this phenomenon has happened this year, following May’s “flower moon.”

“Full moons are a fun time to observe lunar features, as the rest of the sky will be washed out by the light,”  Space.com reported. “With the naked eye, you can see the vast highlands and lowlands of the moon, which can appear to be certain shapes and generate stories about those shapes, depending on the culture you follow.”

Lunar enthusiasts should keep their eyes peeled for the strawberry supermoon on June 14.
NASA/Joel Kowsky
Image showing stages of supermoon.
The supermoon will last through Wednesday.
NASA/Bill Dunford; NASA/Bill Ing
Graphic showing phases of the moon.
Phases of the moon.
NASA/Bill Dunford

Full moons are also a good time to expunge negativity from your life, according to Post astrologer Reda Wigle.

“The full moon calls us to release negative or stagnant energy — be it self-loathing or the Ed Hardy T-shirt in your closet,” Wigle said. “The light of the moon draws out what needs addressing and urges us to take action to expel or correct what we are made to face.”

That release, by the way, could take a thrilling, unique form.

“My own preferred, primal way to salute the full moon is with a deep and unabashed wolf howl. Go outside, face the moon and let it out to let it all go,” said Wigle. “It feels good, it sounds cool and it informs neighbors and strangers that you have immediate access to your inner animal and have little concern for convention.”  

Moonrise behind the Empire State Building in New York City in April 2022.
Moonrise behind the Empire State Building in New York City in April 2022.
Getty Images
Despite its name, the moon isn't strawberry colored.
Despite its name, the moon isn’t strawberry colored.
NASA

What is a strawberry moon?

The strawberry moon name is a tad misleading — it’s not actually strawberry colored in any way.

According to Farmer’s Almanac, it’s the name given to the full moon by Native American tribes and comes from June marking the beginning of summer in North America when strawberries would be harvested.

In Europe — where strawberries did not grow hundreds of years ago — the June full moon was referred to as the rose moon, as it coincided with rose bushes blooming.

When is the strawberry moon in 2022?

The next full moon will be Tuesday morning, June 14, 2022, at 7:52 a.m. EDT; however, the best time to view the supermoon will be 12 hours later at 7:24 p.m.

That is when the moon will be at perigee and closest to the Earth for this orbit.

For those night owls amongst us, the full moon on Tuesday evening into Wednesday morning, June 14 to 15, 2022, will be the lowest full moon of the year, reaching only 23.3 degrees above the horizon Wednesday morning at 1:56 a.m. EDT, according to NASA.

How can I see this year’s full strawberry moon?

The beauty of a supermoon is that you can see it with the naked eye, although there are alternative options for those who want a closer look.

The Virtual Telescope Project in Ceccano, Italy, will have a free livestream of the full moon on Tuesday beginning at 3:15 p.m EDT.

Is there a spiritual meaning to the strawberry moon?

The Farmer’s Almanac says the appearance of the strawberry supermoon marks a particularly lucky time to marry.

According to Nylon, the strawberry supermoon is in Sagittarius and it’s ruled by Jupiter, which represents optimism and growth and signifies a new season, a new moon and a new chance to start a fresh chapter.

If you don’t catch this supermoon, don’t fret — there are two supermoons set to stun the Northern Hemisphere this summer alone, on July 13 and August 11.

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